Dr Laura Wilkinson

Laura2_sepia.JPGLecturer
Department of Psychology

Telephone: (01792) 29 5711

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Research:

I am an experimental psychologist with a research interest in eating behaviour.

My current aims are two-fold:

i) To understand how variety in our food environment affects our eating behaviour.

Variety is a key feature of our current food environment. Many food characteristics contribute to food variety including texture, flavour and colour. Importantly, we know that, the more variety that is in our food, the more we eat. This is helpful when it relates to foods like fruit and vegetables but unhelpful when it relates to foods like confectionary. Indeed, the higher the food variety in someone’s overall diet, the higher their body mass index (BMI).

I am interested in how food variety interacts with other features of the modern food environment and using this information to help consumers incorporate variety into their diets for the benefit of their health.

Key paper:
Wilkinson, L., Hinton, E., Fay, S., Rogers, P. & Brunstrom, J. (2013). The ‘variety effect’ is anticipated in meal planning. Appetite. 60, 175-179.
https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa21021
doi:10.1016/j.appet.2012.10.001

 

ii) To investigate disinhibited eating and how it can be managed.

Disinhibited eating is a term used to describe a ‘general propensity to overeat’. Overeating may occur in response to negative emotions, the tempting smell of foods or a variety of other reasons. I have previously shown that attachment orientation (a measure of inter-personal functioning) and in particular attachment anxiety (fear of abandonment) is a good predictor of disinhibited eating and, in turn, body mass index (BMI).

I am particularly interested in whether attachment orientation and disinhibited eating can account for why some people experience poor outcomes following weight-loss intervention (e.g., bariatric surgery)? As well as whether we can help individuals to manage disinhibited eating by manipulating attachment orientation?

Key paper:
Wilkinson, L., Rowe, A., Robinson, E. & Hardman, C. (2018). Explaining the relationship between attachment anxiety, eating behaviour and BMI. Appetite 127, 214-222.
https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa40028
doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2018.04.029

 

Publications:

Oldham-Cooper, R., Wilkinson, L., Hardman, C., Rogers, P. & Brunstrom, J. (2017). Presenting a food in multiple smaller units increases expected satiety. Appetite. 118, 106-112.
https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa34853
doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2017.07.024

Wilkinson, L., Rowe, A., Sheldon, C., Johnson, A. & Brunstrom, J. (2017). Disinhibited eating mediates differences in attachment insecurity between bariatric surgery candidates/recipients and lean controls. International Journal of Obesity. 41(12), 1831-1834.
https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa34488
doi:10.1038/ijo.2017.157

Wilkinson, L. & Brunstrom, J. (2016). Sensory specific satiety: More than ‘just’ habituation?. Appetite.103, 221-228.
https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa27770
doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2016.04.019

Hardman, C., Christiansen, P. & Wilkinson, L. (2016). Using food to soothe: Maternal attachment anxiety is associated with child emotional eating. Appetite. 99, 91-96.
https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa25495
doi:10.1016/j.appet.2016.01.017

Wilkinson, L., Ferriday, D., Bosworth, M., Godinot, N., Martin, N., Rogers, P. & Brunstrom, J.
(2016). Keeping  Pace with Your Eating: Visual Feedback Affects Eating Rate in Humans. PLOS ONE. 11(2), e0147603
https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa26035
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0147603

Wilkinson, L., Rowe, A. & Heath, G. (2013). Eating me up inside: Priming attachment security and anxiety, and their effects on snacking. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. 30(6), 795-804.
https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa21020
doi:10.1177/0265407512468371

Hinton, E., Brunstrom, J., Fay, S., Wilkinson, L., Ferriday, D., Rogers, P. & de Wijk, R. (2013). Using photography in ‘The Restaurant of the Future’. A useful way to assess portion selection and plate cleaning?. Appetite. 63, 31-35.
https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa21045
doi:10.1016/j.appet.2012.12.008

Brunstrom, J., Burn, J., Sell, N., Collingwood, J., Rogers, P., Wilkinson, L., Hinton, E.,
Maynard, O. & Ferriday, D. (2012). Episodic Memory and Appetite Regulation in Humans. PLoS ONE. 7(12), e50707
https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa21044
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0050707

Wilkinson, L., Hinton, E., Fay, S., Ferriday, D., Rogers, P. & Brunstrom, J. (2012). Computer-based assessments of expected satiety predict behavioural measures of portion-size selection and food intake. Appetite. 59(3), 933-938.
https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa21022
doi:10.1016/j.appet.2012.09.007

Wilkinson, L., Rowe, A., Bishop, R. & Brunstrom, J. (2010). Attachment anxiety, disinhibited eating, and body mass index in adulthood. International Journal of Obesity. 34(9), 1442-1445.
https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa21023
doi:10.1038/ijo.2010.72

Wilkinson, L. & Brunstrom, J. (2009). Conditioning ‘fullness expectations’ in a novel dessert. Appetite. 52(3), 780-783.
https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa21024
doi:10.1016/j.appet.2009.02.009

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